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Justin's International Desk: 21st April 2020

Justin's International Desk: 21st April 2020 Justin's International Desk: 21st April 2020, 7.3 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020

International Desk reports on China's "Wolf Warrior" strategy on diplomacy, as diplomatic rows flared from allegations on spreading misinformation to mistreating African citizens.

The Tuesday Wire: 21st April 2020

Tuesday_Wire_210420_1200.mp3 mp3, 109.1 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020

Following the Prime Minister's announcement yesterday, we have a brief reminder of what alert level 3 will look like.

Laura Kvigstad and Jessica Hopkins bring us with notes of today's parliamentary Epidemic Response Committee.

Bronnie talks about the Ministry for the Environment’s Our Freshwater 2020 report on Greendesk.

Oscar Perress spoke to Auckland Councillor Pippa Coom about tactical urbanism, infrastructure projects and procedures around Covid-19 as well as the Council’s budget on another episode of City Counselling.

Sherry Zhang talked to Green Party co-leader James Shaw about moving the country to alert level 3, guidance for business transitioning online and to contactless takeaways, unsafe living situations and the Green Party's financial challenges. 

International Desk reports on the current state of Chinese diplomacy during the pandemic.

Oscar has another chat with Samuel Miller McDonald on the relationship between the environment, politics and Coivd-19.

What happens at alert level 3 (or level 4 with takeaways)?: 21 April 2020

What happens at alert level 3 (or level 4 with takeaways)?: 21 April 2020 What happens at alert level 3 (or level 4 with takeaways)?: 21 April 2020, 7.39 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020

Lilian looks into what will happen during alert level 3 when New Zealand moves into it next week, while Justin reports on contact tracing in New Zealand, after the Ministry of Health released an audit saying it needs expansion.

City Counselling w/ Cr Pippa Coom; 21 April, 2020

City Counselling w/ Cr Pippa Coom; 21 April, 2020 City Counselling w/ Cr Pippa Coom; 21 April, 2020, 13.07 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020


The structure and meeting procedures at Auckland Council are not the only thing that has and will change in reaction to Covid-19. Last week, the Council met to discuss the budget, and how they are to adjust what they had ready to propose prior to Covid-19, and what they believe are the best steps forward budgeting to find solutions that emerge from Covid-19. 


This week, Oscar Perress is joined by Cr Pippa Coom. They discussed tactical urbanism, infrastructure projects and procedures around Covid-19 but started by addressing the budget. 

A huge thank you to Cr Coom, and Conor Lavery and Louis Laws for their assistance. 

Reflecting on Politics in Creating our Reactions to Covid-19 with Samuel Miller McDonald; 21 April, 2020

Reflecting on Politics in Creating our Reactions to Covid-19 with Samuel Miller McDonald Reflecting on Politics in Creating our Reactions to Covid-19 with Samuel Miller McDonald, 17.49 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020

Earlier this month, Oscar Perress was able to talk to Samuel Miller McDonald, a journalist, writer and student currently based in the UK for his studies at Oxford. Though talking for over an hour, their discussion around Covid-19 can be understood as a discussion on systems.


In the initial weeks of mass shutdowns, false claims of environmental regeneration circulated the media and internet alike. Apparently in Italy, marine life returned to the Venetian canals that have long been polluted by nitrous dioxide, but where the water is now clearer than it has been in sixty years. The lower air pollution, according to one study in China, caused by Covid-19, also may save up to 77,000 lives. To this, there was a reactionary groundswell parroting The Matrix’s Agent Smith, in identifying us, humans, as the virus that has created Papatūānuku’s ills. One tweet from @ThomasSchuIz offering Agent Smith’s line verbatim has over 297,000 likes at time of writing. Many in political circles, including Oscar himself initially, pointed at posts promoting Covid-19 as a solution for environmental recovery, be it true or not, as examples of 'eco-fascism'.

Miller McDonald unpacks this discourse a little more and expands discussing the dangers of arbitrarily and incorrectly labelling political phenomena as such, referencing a recent editorial Miller McDonald wrote for Current Affairs Magazine.

They also discussed conceptualising a response to the climate crisis from Covid-19 and the effect that national emergencies have on our everyday structures. You can find the rest of this series written by Oscar Perress, online by bCast or on air through out the next 2 weeks. You can also access the article mentioned in this piece on Current Affairs, titled ‘It’s not Ecofascism – it’s Liberalism’. Miller McDonald’s other work is accessible on www.samueljmm.com.

 

The Big Q: What does it mean to have an equitable and sustainable food system? April 21, 2020

The Big Q: What does it mean to have an equitable and sustainable food system? April 21, 2020 The Big Q: What does it mean to have an equitable and sustainable food system? April 21, 2020, 24.03 MB
Tue 21 Apr 2020

Saru Jayaraman and Raj Patel have studied the food system and what it means to have an equitable and sustainable system. What are the problems in the system and what are the solutions? Maria Armoudian discusses the food system with them.


For more stories like this head to www.thebigq.org 
 

Education Under Rāhui w/ Artemis Sloan, Clara Bayliss, Harrison Cooke, & Pr. Daniel Bayliss

Education Under Rāhui w/ Artemis Sloan, Clara Bayliss, Harrison Cooke, & Pr. Daniel Bayliss Daniel Bayliss, 20.81 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

Zoë Larsen Cumming brings us a report on education under rahui. She dives into the bubbles of some people who have been highly affected by an online school shift. She interviews eight year old Artemis Sloan, ten year old Clara Bayliss, year thirteen student Harrison Cooke, and an exoplanet hunter and professor of astrophysics, Pr. Daniel Bayliss. 

The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020

The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020 The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020, 102.87 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

On the Wire today:

Zoë Larsen Cumming brings us a report on education under rāhui. She dives into the bubbles of some people who have been highly affected by an online school shift. She interviews an eight year old, a ten year old, a year thirteen student and an exoplanet hunter and professor of astrophysics. 

Lillian Hanley continue with this, and speakes to her younger cousins also under rāhui to see how their first day of term went. Lillian also speaks to Spinoff Columnist Emily Writes about the pressure on teachers and parents this online shift brings.

Bronwyn Wilde brings us a report on prisoner voting rights, looking into the first round of public submissions to the select committee. 

We have Southern Cross as usual, with the latest updates on the Pacific. This week on COVID-19 free zones in the pacific, journalists working remotely and restrictions on media freedom. 

How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020

How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020 How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020, 17.02 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

Last week Lillian was looking into the start of term 2. Lillian rang her cousins, Winter and Beatris, who are under rāhui in their home in Waitakere to see how their first day of term went. The main issue it seemed to them was that they didn’t get to see their friends during the school day. This chat was last week, and their mum told me they were appreciating the shift back into a routine. This week, it's been a little more difficult. Their mum talked about figuring out how they work, the two different platforms they are being given work on plus the emails.The challenges are unprecedented and this is important to acknowledge - for children for parents and for teachers. Emily Writes is an author and columnist for the Spinoff Parents, as well as a mum of two. Last week she wrote about the way online learning is a major shift in education and that we shouldn’t put so much pressure on kids, teachers or parents at this moment. Lillian asked her what her initial response to that shift was.

Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020

Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020 Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020, 15.64 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

With submissions on the Electoral (Registration of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill closing this Friday, Bronnie sheds light on the contentious issue of prisoner voting rights. 

Among other changes, the Bill would reform the 2010 prisoner voting ban, reinstating the right to vote for those serving sentences of less than three years. As well as the usual debates that accompany an issue of constitutional gravity such as this, there has been particular criticism of the speed at which the government is progressing this reform in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

This report begins with a brief history of prisoner voting rights in New Zealand: from the 1993 Electoral Act, to the 2010 reform and subsequent Waitiangi Tribunal report and Taylor v Attorney General Supreme Court case. We then hear excerpts from the Parliamentary debate at the first reading of Andrew Little's proposed Bill. Lastly are the highlights from the first round of oral public submissions to the Justice Select Committee which was held via Zoom.

Public submissions on the Bill close on the 24th of April.