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NZ First's Tracey Martin on recent government announcements: July 8, 2020

NZ First's Tracey Martin on recent government announcements: July 8, 2020 NZ First's Tracey Martin on recent government announcements: July 8, 2020, 32.57 MB
Wed 8 Jul 2020

Lillian speaks to the Minister about two government announcements from yesterday, the first being an extension of temporary working visas, and the second being a hold on incoming flights to the country. They also touched on a tool the Minister has been working on during her time in government. Just for some more information around the visa extensions, given this is not Martin’s portfolio she indicated she may not have all the details. Minister Iain Lees-Galloway announced yesterday that the Government is "making immediate short-term changes to visa settings to support temporary migrants already onshore in New Zealand and their employers, while also ensuring New Zealanders needing work are prioritised".

So this means, 

- Extending all existing employer-assisted temporary work visas for people in New Zealand and whose visas are due to expire before the end of 2020 by six months, benefiting around 16,500 workers

- Shifting the stand down by 6 months to February 2021. So this affects migrant workers who are subject to the 12 month stand-down period and were going to have to leave New Zealand this year will now be able to stay for the duration of the extension, and that affects 600 workers. The stand-down period being the amount of time one has to leave the country before applying to come back and work. The government states that, The stand-down period was introduced in 2017 to prevent lower-skilled, lower-paid foreign workers from becoming well settled in New Zealand without a pathway to residence. Just a note here because of the way in which lower-skilled as a term has negative connotations, the Government is continuing to work on a number of changes, which were announced pre-COVID-19. These changes include a different way to define lower-skilled/lower-paid employment and a new process for employer-assisted work visas expected to be fully in place by mid-2021.

- Finally, the last part of the announcement was ensuring New Zealanders needing work continue to be prioritised.

So back to Tracey Martin, Lillian started by asking her how this will work.

 

EDIT: Minister Iain Lees-Galloway's response 08/07/2020:

“Temporary work visas are there to fill temporary gaps in the labour market and that is clear when people apply for temporary visas. Work to residency is only available for more skilled jobs where there is a longer term skills shortage.

“The extension to visas announced yesterday is to give people breathing space to work out what is best for them. The New Zealand labour market is changing as more New Zealanders lose their jobs and as always, immigration is there to fill the gaps in our labour market. As the gaps close, there may be fewer opportunities for temporary migrant workers.

“We value the contribution our migrant communities make to New Zealand and it’s great that many do become residents and citizens. However, like in most countries around the world, temporary immigration is for temporary work opportunities. That’s a choice people make for themselves.

[on the low-skilled issue] “Last year we introduced changes to the employer assisted temporary work visas that includes introducing the use of pay rates as a proxy for skills. In the vast majority of cases higher skilled roles are paid above the median wage so the median wage is being used to assess the skill level, instead of complicated skills assessments under ANZCO.”

Is China's Plague Case a Threat? (Spoiler: No) w/ Helen Petousis-Harris: July 8, 2020

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Wed 8 Jul 2020

Felix Walton speaks to University of Auckland Associate Professor Helen Petousis-Harris about the recent coverage of a case of bubonic plague in China, whether the plague is actually still a threat, and how it capitalizes on Corona-Panic.

The Wednesday Wire: July 8, 2020

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Wed 8 Jul 2020

On Dear Science today with Marcus Jones we touch back on some coronavirus news, we also hear about some concerns being raised after scientists collect DNA in China for a crime related database, and lastly, scientists are moving to strip names of racist people who have been commemorated in prizes and awards.

Lillian speaks to Anjum Rahman of the Islamic Women’s Council about their submission to the Royal Commission of Inquiry about the terror attacks last year.

Felix speaks to Helen Petousis-Harris from the University of Auckland about the bubonic blague

NZ First’s Tracey Martin discusses the two government announcements yesterday regarding temporary visa changes and border closures, as well as a new learning support tool she has developed. 

City Counselling w/ Cr Tracy Mulholland; July 7, 2020

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Tue 7 Jul 2020

This week, 95bFM Reporter Oscar Perress speaks to Councillor Tracy Mulholland about her transition from the Whau Local Board to Whau Ward Councillor, as well as how she maintains her community involvement amongst all her other responsibilities.   

Justin's International Desk: 7th July 2020

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Tue 7 Jul 2020

International Desk reports on the local and international reaction to Hong Kong's new national security law.

The Tuesday Wire with Justin: 7th July 2020

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Tue 7 Jul 2020

Oscar caught up with Auckland Councillor on City Counselling to talk about her transition from a chair of a local ward to an Auckland councillor.

International Desk reports on the reaction to the Hong Kong national security law.

On Green Desk, Bronnie talked to Kepa Morgan about mauri modelling to measure the vitality of ecosystems.

Hanna spoke to Dr. Jaimie Veale about the 2023 cencus including questions on sexual orientation and identity.

Including the LGBT Community in the Census: July 7, 2020

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Tue 7 Jul 2020

Hanna spoke to Dr Jaimie Veale, president of the Professional Association of Transgender Health Aotearoa and principle investigator for the Counting Ourselves Study, about Statistics NZ's recent announcement that it would now be including questions on sexuality and gender identity in the 2023 census.

Unequal Pay in New Zealand w/ Lisa Lawrence: July 6, 2020

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Mon 6 Jul 2020

A report released by the Human Rights Commission has revealed that 44 percent of New Zealanders have experienced being paid less than someone who does the same job as them. To find out more about pay disparity in New Zealand, Zoë Larsen Cumming interviewed the president of the National Council of Women in New Zealand, Lisa Lawrence. 

Student and Teacher Wellbeing Boost w/ Liam Rutherford

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Mon 6 Jul 2020

Recently we saw a 52 million dollar injection for schools and early education to help deal with lower attendance levels due to COVID-19. This funding will be put towards looking after those with low attendance and high risk students, with funding for social workers, teacher aides and other support staff. While the New Zealand Education Institute, also known as the NZEI, is happy with this injection and that it is well timed, they want to see more systemic changes. To understand more about their position, James Tapp talks to the president of NZEI, Liam Rutherford, and starts off by asking about what this funding means for teachers.

The Monday Wire with Sherry: July 6th, 2020

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On today's Wire: 

Weekly chat with Green party co-leader James Shaw on the 'waka jumping' bill, RMA and gauranteed minimum income.

Southern Cross: Pacific Media Centre director David Robie, on rainbow warrior, we follow up on domestic violence in PNG, and journalism in west papua. 

Zoë interviews the National Council of Women in New Zealand president Lisa Lawrence on unequal pay in New Zealand. 

Producer James Tapp talks to Liam Rutherford from the New Zealand Education institute about a recent cash injection for wellbeing as well as systemic change.