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Education Under Rāhui w/ Artemis Sloan, Clara Bayliss, Harrison Cooke, & Pr. Daniel Bayliss

Education Under Rāhui w/ Artemis Sloan, Clara Bayliss, Harrison Cooke, & Pr. Daniel Bayliss Daniel Bayliss, 20.81 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

Zoë Larsen Cumming brings us a report on education under rahui. She dives into the bubbles of some people who have been highly affected by an online school shift. She interviews eight year old Artemis Sloan, ten year old Clara Bayliss, year thirteen student Harrison Cooke, and an exoplanet hunter and professor of astrophysics, Pr. Daniel Bayliss. 

The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020

The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020 The Monday Wire: April 20th, 2020, 102.87 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

On the Wire today:

Zoë Larsen Cumming brings us a report on education under rāhui. She dives into the bubbles of some people who have been highly affected by an online school shift. She interviews an eight year old, a ten year old, a year thirteen student and an exoplanet hunter and professor of astrophysics. 

Lillian Hanley continue with this, and speakes to her younger cousins also under rāhui to see how their first day of term went. Lillian also speaks to Spinoff Columnist Emily Writes about the pressure on teachers and parents this online shift brings.

Bronwyn Wilde brings us a report on prisoner voting rights, looking into the first round of public submissions to the select committee. 

We have Southern Cross as usual, with the latest updates on the Pacific. This week on COVID-19 free zones in the pacific, journalists working remotely and restrictions on media freedom. 

How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020

How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020 How to make the shift to online learning w/ Emily Writes: April 20, 2020, 17.02 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

Last week Lillian was looking into the start of term 2. Lillian rang her cousins, Winter and Beatris, who are under rāhui in their home in Waitakere to see how their first day of term went. The main issue it seemed to them was that they didn’t get to see their friends during the school day. This chat was last week, and their mum told me they were appreciating the shift back into a routine. This week, it's been a little more difficult. Their mum talked about figuring out how they work, the two different platforms they are being given work on plus the emails.The challenges are unprecedented and this is important to acknowledge - for children for parents and for teachers. Emily Writes is an author and columnist for the Spinoff Parents, as well as a mum of two. Last week she wrote about the way online learning is a major shift in education and that we shouldn’t put so much pressure on kids, teachers or parents at this moment. Lillian asked her what her initial response to that shift was.

Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020

Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020 Prisoner Voting Rights: Submissions to the Select Committee: 20 April, 2020, 15.64 MB
Mon 20 Apr 2020

With submissions on the Electoral (Registration of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill closing this Friday, Bronnie sheds light on the contentious issue of prisoner voting rights. 

Among other changes, the Bill would reform the 2010 prisoner voting ban, reinstating the right to vote for those serving sentences of less than three years. As well as the usual debates that accompany an issue of constitutional gravity such as this, there has been particular criticism of the speed at which the government is progressing this reform in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

This report begins with a brief history of prisoner voting rights in New Zealand: from the 1993 Electoral Act, to the 2010 reform and subsequent Waitiangi Tribunal report and Taylor v Attorney General Supreme Court case. We then hear excerpts from the Parliamentary debate at the first reading of Andrew Little's proposed Bill. Lastly are the highlights from the first round of oral public submissions to the Justice Select Committee which was held via Zoom.

Public submissions on the Bill close on the 24th of April.

 

State of the Welfare System in Covid-19: 17th of April, 2020

State of the Welfare System in a Covid-19 Climate: 17th of April, 2020 State of the Welfare System in a Covid-19 Climate: 17th of April, 2020, 6.33 MB
Fri 17 Apr 2020

Social Welfare is an integral part of our society, it serves to provide for those in hard times, a safety net that should be sufficient for families & makes up the social policy of Aotearoa.

 

 

 

The Friday Wire: April 17th, 2020

The Friday Wire: April 17th, 2020 The Friday Wire: April 17th, 2020, 103.76 MB
Fri 17 Apr 2020

Today on the show we had Laura bringing us the regular chat with the National Party’s Denise Lea...

A quick poll position touching on whether you think the government will leave level 4 or not at the end of the 4 weeks. 

We hear from Louis Laws who is looking into the state of our welfare system and how this could change. We heard from AAAP, CPAG, and CTU on how we got to this point and what problems we have with the system at the moment. 

And Lillian spoke with Rod Oram, following the Treasury’s announcement regarding possible unemployment figures. We also spoke about how the pandemic could impact capitalism.

Treasury's modelling on unemployment and capitalism with Rod Oram: April 17, 2020

Treasury's modelling on unemployment and capitalism with Rod Oram: April 17, 2020 Treasury's modelling on unemployment and capitalism with Rod Oram: April 17, 2020, 17.42 MB
Fri 17 Apr 2020

On Tuesday, the Treasury announced some unemployment figures based on modelling from different scenarios relating to the Covid19 pandemic and our subsequent rāhui.

The scenarios show:

  • That unemployment can be kept below 10%, and return to 5% in 2021 with additional Government support. Work is already well advanced on further fiscal support.
  • Without additional support, unemployment could have hit 13.5% under scenario 1 (four weeks in Level 4), while scenarios requiring more time in Level 4 showed a peak of 17.5%-26%.
  • New Zealand’s underlying strength means the economy can bounce back to be $70 billion larger by 2024 than in 2019.

So, the best outlook we are dealing with at the moment is an increase in unemployment to just under 10 percent, and some commentators have pointed out this number is already a reality for Māori. So! What does this all mean? And what effect will Covid19 have on the economic system in general? To get some idea, Lillian Hanly rang Rod Oram. They started off by talking about the figures but ended up talking about Capitalism more generally.

 

Image credit:
Original image from Harvard Business Review | Animation by Thomas Fink-Jensen

Alert Level Three Restrictions with Lillian Hanly: 17th of April, 2020

Alert Level Three Restrictions with Lillian Hanly: 17th of April, 2020 Alert Level Three Restrictions with Lillian Hanly: 17th of April, 2020, 3.49 MB
Fri 17 Apr 2020

Moving into our fourth week of the rāhui, the government yesterday outlined what Alert Level 3 would look like.

The principles for level 3 are to restrict contact with others as much as possible. The Prime Minister indicated this shift would not be a rush to normality, it is a progression, and carries many of the restrictions in place at level 4. 

Lillian Hanly fills us in on what kind of restrictions we will be looking at for alert level three...

 

The Inevitability of Coastal Flooding: 17th of April, 2020

The Inevitability of Coastal Flooding: 17th of April, 2020 The Inevitability of Coastal Flooding: 17th of April, 2020, 4.83 MB
Fri 17 Apr 2020

The flooding in Owhiro Bay this week paints a picture of what is likely to become a more frequent event over the next decades. Reports indicate that many in Aotearoa will be affected by the rising sea levels. Wellington council for one is taking it seriously with officials claiming that consequential conversations around costal flooding need to be had this year. The events in Owhiro Bay are acting as a catalyst for these talks. 

The Thursday Wire: April 16, 2020

The Thursday Wire: April 16, 2020 The Thursday Wire: April 16, 2020, 100.54 MB
Thu 16 Apr 2020

This morning's Epidemic Response Committee meeting heard from RBNZ, CTU, and Trade Ministers; we're summarising key points for you. Hanna speaks to sociologist Campbell Jones about the change in language during rāhui; what was once ‘unskilled’ work has become ‘essential services’. Labour’s Andrew Little tells Mary-Margaret about why the tertiary package only includes the ability to accumulate more debt, and what he makes of the claims of the group calling for a ‘Plan B’. Rachel brings an update on the State of the States. Finally, Radio Adelaide’s Zoe Kounadis shares what conversations look like in Australia about their Chief Medical Officer’s comments at our own Epidemic Response Committee, as well as the newest DC superhero: an Aboriginal character from Pilbara.