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The Wire with India Essuah

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Revenge of the Rich with Austin Mitchell

Revenge of the Rich with Austin Mitchell Revenge of the Rich with Austin Mitchell, 27.36 MB
Thu 24 Aug 2017

Following from his hit book from 1972 The Half Gallon Quarter Acre Pavlova Paradise, Austin Mitchell returns to the book shelves with his new book Revenge of the Rich. Here, Mitchell observes the rise, fall and consequences of Neoliberalism in New Zealand and Britain.

Hospitality workers call for higher wages

Hospitality workers call for higher wages Hospitality workers call for higher wages, 13.8 MB
Wed 26 Jul 2017

According to a Radio New Zealand report released today: hospitality bosses say they are struggling to get locals to apply for jobs and need skilled migrants to stay in the country to keep the industry going. Hospitality workers have hit back saying that if they want more New Zealand staff they need to pay more. 95bFM reporter Reuben McClaren speaks to Chloe King, a hospitality veteran who has launched a workers campaign called Raise the Bar.

Are Kiwis still too staunch when it comes to mental health?

Are Kiwis still too staunch when it comes to mental health? Are Kiwis still too staunch when it comes to mental health?, 14.52 MB
Wed 26 Jul 2017

Mental health is an issue that has been greatly talked about over the last few months, with acknowledgement of its massive impact on New Zealanders beginning to be addressed in mainstream media. However, we do have a way to go, with New Zealand's suicide rate still being one of the highest in the world. 95 bFM producer, Will Parsonson, speaks to Ekant Veer, a lecturer on marketing and media from Canterbury university about the impacts that media can have in changing socially ingrained perceptions of mental health issues.

The Wire with Ximena: Wednesday July 26, 2017

The Wire with Ximena: Wednesday July 26, 2017 The Wire with Ximena: Wednesday July 26, 2017, 83.27 MB
Wed 26 Jul 2017

This week on the show, Ximena, Will & Reuben are back with a tonne of great stories for ya, everything from hospitality workers demanding more pay to the media’s influence on mental health. AUT’s Allan Blackman joins the team for Dear Science, chatting today about how ISIS are apparently not very “smart” for failing to build a dirty bomb, as well as about the dangerous mislabelling of ‘synthetic cannabis’. NZ First’s Tracey Martin also has a chat with Ximena about a new survey that shows high living costs are driving significant numbers of teachers away from Auckland.

Digging deeper into Australia's past

Digging deeper into Australia's past Digging deeper into Australia's past, 11.86 MB
Tue 25 Jul 2017

A new archaeological dig in Australia’s north has discovered artefacts which show Aboriginal people inhabited the continent for thousands of years more than previously thought.

A team of archaeologists and local Aboriginal community members have excavated evidence that places people in Australia at least 65,000 years ago, pushing back the timing by about 5,000 to 18,000 years.

Reporter Mack Smith spoke to Queensland University Associate Professor Chris Clarkson, one of the lead authors behind the research.

Linking NZ's rates of poverty and youth suicide

Linking NZ's rates of poverty and youth suicide Linking NZ's rates of poverty and youth suicide, 13.95 MB
Tue 25 Jul 2017

One in 20 New Zealand high school students attempt suicide each year. A study conducted by the University of Auckland surveyed 9000 NZ high school students and revealed 4.5 percent of students had attempted suicide and 70 percent of these have made multiple attempts.

To find out more about these numbers, producer Lucy Austin spoke with a co-author of the study Associate Professor and paediatrician Simon Denny. 

Giving young writers 'a leg up'

Giving young writers 'a leg up' Giving young writers 'a leg up', 15.14 MB
Tue 25 Jul 2017

Starling is an online journal which aims to give writers aged under 25 a platform to have their work published and possibly noticed by editors and festival directors hunting for fresh talent. 

India Essuah spoke to Starling's founder, poet Louise Wallace, about how they select work and how Starling has helped young authors find wider success.

Starling's winter issue is released today - click here to read it.

Fighting to keep tigers alive

Fighting to keep tigers alive Fighting to keep tigers alive, 8.7 MB
Tue 25 Jul 2017

Ahead of International Tiger Day on Saturday, the World Wildlife Fund is raising awareness for tiger conservation worldwide.

A United Nations report from last year shows tiger species have faced a 97 percent decline in population over the past century and some subspecies have already gone extinct due to animal poaching and trafficking.

Reporter Jack Marshall spoke to WWF Cambodia’s Rohit Singh, who is part of the WWF Tigers Alive Initiative there.

The Wire with India: Tuesday July 25th, 2017

The Wire with India: Tuesday July 25th, 2017 The Wire with India: Tuesday July 25th, 2017, 104.5 MB
Tue 25 Jul 2017

On today's Wire, producer Lucy Austin looks at a University of Auckland study that shows 4.5 percent of high school students have attempted suicide.

Reporter Mack Smith speaks to Professor Chris Clarkson about new excavations which place Aboriginal people in Australia between 5,000 and 18,000 years earlier than previously thought.

On the Green Desk reporter Jack Marshall speaks to World Wildlife Fund about the fight for tiger conservation, ahead of International Tiger Day.

Māori Party co-leader Marama Fox says the Government is failing to address the issue of homelessness.

Poet Louise Wallace also joins us to discuss the new issue of Starling Magazine which is out today, showcasing the work of talented young authors.

Tears of Rangi

Tears of Rangi Tears of Rangi, 10.76 MB
Mon 24 Jul 2017

Renowned anthropologist Dame Anne Salmond’s new book, Tears of Rangi, is a philosophical and historical exploration of interactions and colliding worlds. Beginning with an inquiry into the early period of encounters between Māori and Europeans in New Zealand, she then investigates such clashes and exchanges in key areas of contemporary life – waterways, land, the sea and people. Our world is defined by maps and calendars – making it seem that this is the nature of reality itself. But in New Zealand, concepts of whakapapa and hau, complex networks and reciprocal exchange, may point to new ways of understanding interactions between peoples, and between people and the natural world. Reporter Pearl Little speaks to Dame Salmond about the book.