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Christchurch terror attacks, a year later w/ Anjum Rahman: March 9th, 2020

Christchurch terror attacks, a year later w/ Anjum Rahman: March 9th, 2020 Christchurch terror attacks, a year later w/ Anjum Rahman: March 9th, 2020, 8.94 MB
Mon 9 Mar 2020

Anjum Rahman is a spokesperson for the Islamic Women's Council. This group announced shortly after the March 15th terror attacks that they had been trying for years to warn authorities of the very real threats the Muslim community was facing. They have now told RNZ exclusively the report they gave to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the shootings. They believe 'it's likely the Christchurch mosque attacks would never have happened if the public service - including police and security agencies - had not ignored their repeated warnings.' Lillian Hanly spoke with Anjum Rahman a couple of weeks ago in the leadup to the anniversary and started by asking how she was feeling about that. 

Armed Response Teams & the Arms Down Coalition: Friday 6th of March

Armed Response Teams & the Arms Down Coalition: Friday 6th of March Armed Response Teams & the Arms Down Coalition: Friday 6th of March, 11.38 MB
Fri 6 Mar 2020

For the police, their mission statement on their website is for "New Zealand to be the safest country it can possibly be". However, for many New Zealanders, their view on the police isn’t quite as positive. Our justice system has been called “systematically racist” - with profiled discrimination against both Maori & Pasifika communities. 

The police themselves admit to these unconscious biases, so the announcement of arming the police, & releasing squads of armed officers onto the streets of Manukau, Waikato, & Canterbury, came with some controversy.

These teams have been deployed since late October last year, & already they’re being sent out, on average, seventy-five times a day. Militarised patrols of the police, routine traffic stops & high-risk situations.  As you can imagine, Not everyone’s happy about this…

So I got in touch with Emilie Rākete, a spokesperson for People Against Prisons Aotearoa & a member of the Arms Down Coalition, a collective of organisations & experts affected by police violence. The group's organising a national day of action - The first event Against Police Militarisation in Aotearoa.

Abortion Law Reform with Terry Bellamak

Abortion Law Reform with Terry Bellamak Abortion Law Reform with Terry Bellamak, 12.03 MB
Fri 6 Mar 2020

Sam speaks with Terry Bellamak from Abortion Law Reform Association NZ about the Abortion Legislation Bill currently before parliament. They unpack what the bill seeks to change and what the current conditions for access are. Also discussed are the ways in which the narratives around people accessing abortion influence the shift towards improved policy.

The Wire with Laura Kvigstad: 6th of March, 2020

The Wire with Laura Kvigstad: 6th of March, 2020 The Wire with Laura Kvigstad: 6th of March, 2020, 106.06 MB
Fri 6 Mar 2020

This week on the Friday Wire...

National’s Denise Lee joins Laura Kvigstad for their weekly chat.  This week they chat about National MP David Bennet's comments concerning covid 19 and the criticism the party has had from New Zealand's leading microbiologist, Souxsie Wiles.  Then they chat about the National Party's calls for a tax cut for middle-income earners to address economic concerns around the coronavirus. Finally, they chat about the protests at National's 22nd Bluegreen conference...

Then, producer, Louis Laws speaks with Emilie Rakete from People Against Prisons Aotearoa on the Arms down Coalition & the national day of action against the police...

And finally, Sam Denne, speak with Terry Bellamak from Abortion Law Reform Association NZ about the Abortion Legislation Bill that has just passed it’s second reading. They talk about the ways in which the public conversation around law reform puts extra demands onto pregnant people to speak about highly emotional experiences they have when accessing reproductive healthcare.

The Wire with Mary-Margaret: March 5, 2020

The Wire with Mary-Margaret: March 5, 2020 The Wire with Mary-Margaret: March 5, 2020, 122.29 MB
Thu 5 Mar 2020

Rachel Simpson speaks to the Migrant Workers Association President about xenophobia and Shane Jones; Politics lecturer Maria Armoudian recaps Super Tuesday in the US; Mary-Margaret has another weekly catch up with Andrew Little and they discuss multiple reform developments; and Radio Adelaide’s Zoe Kounadis reports on the closure Australian Associated Press in Neighbourhood Watch

Super Tuesday with Maria Armoudian: March 5, 2020

Super Tuesday with Maria Armoudian: March 5, 2020 Super Tuesday with Maria Armoudian: March 5, 2020, 10.62 MB
Thu 5 Mar 2020

Super Tuesday has brought an acknowledgement by Bernie Sanders that his campaign hasn’t been as successful as he hoped in galvanising young voters. Mary-Margaret spoke to Maria Armoudian for a recap on the developments

Neighbourhood Watch: March 5, 2020

Neighbourhood Watch: March 5, 2020 Neighbourhood Watch: March 5, 2020, 25.14 MB
Thu 5 Mar 2020

Zoe ponders the impact of Australian Associated Press closing its doors come June and the trials for Security Guards at Manus Island seeking compensation.

The Reality of Migrant Workers w/ Anu Kaloti: March 5, 2020

The Reality of Migrant Workers w/ Anu Kaloti: March 5, 2020 The Reality of Migrant Workers w/ Anu Kaloti: March 5, 2020, 36.04 MB
Thu 5 Mar 2020

In light of Cabinet Minister Shane Jones's most recent comments about Indian students "ruining academic institutions" because of "unfettered immigration", Rachel Simpson speaks to Anu Kaloti, President of the Migrant Workers Association, about what the reality is for migrants in New Zealand. Kaloti offers facts that correct the minister's comments, and explains what can be done about xenophobia when it comes from a government figure.

The Wire with Lillian: March 4, 2020

The Wire with Lillian: March 4, 2020 The Wire with Lillian: March 4, 2020, 106.46 MB
Wed 4 Mar 2020

On Dear Science with AUT’s Marcus Jones we have a coronavirus update, a brightening star and a genome study about rats in New York.

And Lillian has a (lengthy) piece on Iran and US relations. Now this was something that was all happening at the start of this year (back when the newsroom was still closed for the break) and we have touched on it a little since we’ve been back but Lillian thought she'd conduct a very in depth interview on the matter and go a bit more into the history of the two countries. This is fairly timely with the Iranian elections as well as the spread of the coronavirus there.

Iran and the US - what next? March 4, 2020

Iran and the US - what next? March 4, 2020 Iran and the US - what next? March 4, 2020, 55.93 MB
Wed 4 Mar 2020

So, the US and Iran. Often two countries referred to as being in tension. At the beginning of this year there were some major instances in the heightening of tensions between Iran and the United States. On the 3rd January the US ordered the assassination by drone strike of Major General Qasem Soleimani - the head of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards. He was considered the second most powerful person in Iran. Following this, there was relief as well as anger at his death. There was also shock around the world for what this would mean for Iran US relations which have been considerably rocky since President Trump removed the US from the Nuclear Deal signed in 2015 with Iran and a number of other countries. In removing themselves from the deal they also reapplied sanctions on Iran that had been removed as part of the 2015 agreement. The sanctions, along with mismanagement and a shock rise in fuel prices led to nationwide protests last year in Iran. More than 1000 people are believed to have been killed. After the assassination both countries were on high alert and this led to the shooting down of a civilian plane by the Revolutionary Guard who mistook it for a cruise missile. 176 people were on board and all were killed. As the Iranian elections are upon us, as well as the American elections later this year, Lillian thought it could be good to have a big conversation about what this all means. Negar Mortazavi is an Iranian American journalist and media analyst based in Washington DC. She has been following Iran news and US Iran relations for a decade. I reached out to her to provide a bit more context about the history between these two countries and to understand more about how this political warfare, which could lead to actual warfare, is affecting the everyday lives of people. 

 

 

It would be remiss of me not to mention what is happening in Iran right now with the coronavirus. On instagram this morning a post came up by the user See you in Iran - this is an account for the Hostel and Public Cafe of the same name situated in Tehran, however the bio also states ‘voices from within Iran to avoid others speaking on our behalf’. The post they made reads as follows: 

“A new phase of disaster and isolation has hit Iran after the frightful news of Iran becoming a new epicenter of the Coronavirus outbreak; another critical point we are facing along the recurring crisis during the past few months. Firstly, authorities took no measurement to keep Covid19 from entering the country, and further on had no plans to quarantine virus-hit cities. False medical advice, avoiding reliable statistics release, and shortage on health services are causing social chaos. Many countries have closed their air and land borders with Iran and lots of businesses are on the verge of collapse. Low-paid workers have no choice but to use public transportation, vulnerable women and children are working on the street and subways, with poor sanitizing conditions; and yet there is no sign of the officials’ support. The private sector, conforming to the rule of capital, have mostly found their business more valuable than their workers health conditions and did not shut down their workspace as well. For most of us there is no excitement about our new year celebration, Nowrus, with no family or friend gatherings this year. It is hard not to lose hope and fight for the good, though we do not stop to depict our global audience the challenge people inside Iran are coping with these days: health insecurity, unstable career, political disappointment, and an unknown future.”